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, national security law on both sides. we are very pleased to announce the book cover has received the 2012 american graphic design award and it is our hope not only will the outside win an award but perhaps the inside. .. critical and important debates. we have one of the senior members working in the back. we want to think jack for being here and all the support that you have given, not only in the book but our committee since you have joined the bar association. appreciated. i speak on behalf of all of our committee. we are pleased to say that we have a number of positive responses. the former national counterintelligence executive, the director, bob bryant, one of the best of the key issues of the national security arena. what makes a stand that is the bipartisan dialogue, intellectual rigor, timeliness, and readability. a must read for practitioners and policy makers and the general public. i take with of would like to do that this point is sort of explain how the book came about. the person going task to do that is bernie horowitz. as briefly explain the process by which he decided to
started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little bit slow. we had this conversation 10 years ago. now, i will stick my neck out and say for a variety of reasons, some of which are circumstantial, some of which have to do with the leadership in the standing committee come i believe that this topic will have to become an a more important topic. and that wi
. in his first national address since signing the constitution into law, morsi called for unity in the aftermath of egypt's divisive referendum. >> because of this result, in order to build the nation, we must all come to gather, which is why dialogue has become a necessity we cannot do without. we all seek within this framework a dialogue of national unity over issues we face in the future. >> president morsi spoke after egypt's upper house of parliament held its first session following the constitution's passage. egyptian opposition leaders have vowed to continue their protest against morsi, calling the constitution process unfair and too skewed toward islam is rules. at a news conference, a spokesperson called for a new demonstration january 25, the second anniversary of the egyptian revolution. >> the front reiterate its rejection of occurred formation of the upper house of parliament and the politics of distributing bribes and the spoils of battle and in sincere dialogue that has now been taking place for some time at the presidency, which is a dialogue through submission t
. president vladimir putin has signed a new law banning those adoptions, leaving shocked adults and children wondering what will happen next. here is nbc's kerry sanders. >> reporter: cindy and dennis boyer were weeks away from adopting baby adeline. they met the almost 2-year-old recently as they visited her russian orphanage. but now vladimir putin has signed a law that despite mounds of paperwork and thousands of dollars already spent, all the more than 1,500 adoptions currently under way and any future adoptions are permanently cancelled. >> she's for a home, ready for a family, ready to be loved. >> reporter: why the new adoption law signed so publicly? russian authorities say some of the adopted have been abused or died. one unruly boy was even sent back on a plane alone to russia. also at play here say u.s. experts, retaliation. a visa ban on russian officials accused of human rights violations. >> they're retaliating by holding hostage orphans that otherwise would have homes in the united states. >> reporter: the state department says we deeply regret russia's decision. >> i would as
vote on something then. the senate could also pass it and signed into law. gregg: right. >> everyone is talking about there is not enough time. this is not true. congress can do whatever it wants. if they agree, the two parties agree congress can pass things very quickly the trick is getting both sides to agree. gregg: it is always small ball and it is never really significant. which shows an utter lack of courage. and the american people, you know, feel that way too about their representatives. put up on the "gallup poll." "gallup poll", likelihood of averting the fiscal cliff. there you see, susan, people are losing faith. i'm actually surprised that they haven't lost all faith. >> actually i was going to say the same thing. i think that number is pretty surprising. i would think it is much higher at this point. perhaps the public is getting used to this kind of game they play chicken and at the last second they come up with a deal. remember august 2011, we thought the nation was running out of money, we would hit the debt ceiling, government would partially shut down, literally at
-president harry truman called the do-nothing congress, it managed to pass 906 bills into law. think about that as you watch the next report about one of the few things lawmakers seem to agree on, dismantling a little known office that's designed for one simple thing, keeping them honest. >> what is outrageous about it is you see members of congress on both sides saying they have zero tolerance for unethical conduct, but behind closed doors, they're quietly trying to kill the one body in congress that is trying to seriously go after unethical members. >> melanie sloan is director of c.r.e.w. or citizens for responsibility and ethics in washington. she's talking about the office of congressional ethics, the only government body outside of congress whose sole mandate is to formally investigate members inside congress, but many of the same members of congress want the oce gone. >> the oce has forced members of congress to take ethics more seriously. it has forced the ethics committee act and let all members of congress know they can't skate by like they have for so many years with unethical c
this shows a lack of judgment by the newspaper, and i think that we should not be stigmatizing every law-abiding gun owner out there and i think particularly after newtown, let's engage in a conversation about sensible policies that going owners, including probably many of these people whose names were printed in the paper and most americans agree on, like background checks for all gun sales and getting military style assault weapons off the streets and other sensible policies. >> the interesting thing about this, apparently these gun permits are for handguns only because you can't find out who owns let's say a semiautomatic assault rifle. those things aren't made public. why is that? >> well, that is a serious problem, the gun lobby has exerted its pressure to keep a lot of very important crime gun data secret, for example, there are restrictions which now prevent us from finding out which gun dealers supply most crimin criminals. gun lobbyists shut it down with friends in congress which protects corrupt gun dealers. most law-abiding gun dealers would like to expose the bad ones. >> so
. they have passed only 219 bills into law making it 100 bills behind the 104th congress who until now has been the most do-nothing of the do-nothing congress congresses. with this, it is no problem to predict the answer to howie mandel's question, no deal. soon to be ex-congressman jason altmeyer who is leaving the establishment. >> good to be here. >> can you tell us, since you are soon to leave that building why your colleagues cannot come to a deal on this issue? >> if you look at the political structure in washington, it is divided government and that is what american people vote for most of the time, and you have a house leadership in particular that has a conference that they represent that is almost evenly split between hard-line conservative tea party-type members and more pro business and anti-tax, and i would say more thoughtful members on issues like this, and then of course, the president sitting down at the other end of pennsylvania avenue, and on the senate, it looks like they are starting to work together better than we are in the house, and that is where the deal will be s
is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed two weeks ago. that law puts financial restrictions on russians accused of human rights violations, bans them from also traveling to the united states. i want to bring in our matthew chance from london. and matthew, of course, you were a correspondent in moscow for a very long time here. it seems at least there's a split. you've got russia's foreign minister who actually criticized putin before he signed this ban. so what is going on here? is this a power play? and is this something that is actually going to take effect? >> i mean, you're right. there has been a very rare split in the russian political elite about this issue. there's been some criticism that was leaked to the press in russia about how some officials including the foreign minister concerned about what the impact this may have. also an opposition newspaper in russia has issued a petition, saying the law should not been enacted. that's had more than 100,000 signatures. obviously, it's something that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power
-12 in. around lake tahoe. heavy snowfall expected tire chain laws will be in effect. proportions of ukiah and to the north bay locations. it will eventually make its way to the greater bay area. this is a fast-moving system. heavy downpours at times. if your concerned about the flooding of? there could be even toppled trees because of the saturation level of the ground. we will see their rainfall in the north bay and it will spread to protest it could be heavy. and that rainfall still having difficulty. with 6:00 a.m., you are definitely gore to want your umbrella. pleasanton, this is a chilly at 38. the highs for today you can see 50s richmond, 54 degrees. here is a look at the seven day around the bay. it is wet today so watch for those patric trees tht could impact even power lines because of the current a saturation level of the soil. >> most areas are looking decent from the east bay to san francisco the san mateo bridge is also not a problem. traffic picked up lightly but easy, no matter what direction you are going on the san mateo, or the golden gate. very light. in fact,
a week, although arizona law currently prohibits carrying guns on public school grounds. the idea follows of course the school shootings in newtown, connecticut and the nra's call to station armed officers at public schools. >>> and the first step toward a potential lawsuit in connecticut after the shootings at sandy hook elementary. paperwork has been filed for a $100 million claim on behalf of one of the children who lived through the tragedy. a lawyer for the 6-year-old survivor claims she sustained emotional and physical trauma as a result of hearing the assault over the school intercom. it faults the board of education among others for failing to protect the children from, quote, foreseeable harm. >>> in orlando last night a show of solidarity with the newtown victims at the russell athletic bowl. in their game with rutgers virginia tech's players wore a large ribbon on their helmets that read, "58 prevail." it was a reference to the total number of victims from both the newtown, connecticut shootings and the virginia tech shootings. >>> an update tonight on former president george h
how the two connect. well, this is my mother-in-law, and she was as old as the year, so she was 24 in 1924, when she was married. and i have a feeling that perhaps this was a special wedding present from her husband. i just wonder. it isn't the sort of thing parents would give. oh, no. far too-- far too flippant i would have thought for a parent. but, um, for a husband maybe. it might have been a wedding present. now, let's just have a look here, because i can see on a lot of the pots and the devices and the buffer and so on there's the initial "n." "n." she was nell. wonderful. her name was ellen but she was known as nell. and the hallmarks... well, they're different. i can see their different. they're very tiny. not easy to see. i can see they date from about 1926 through to about 1929. oh, so-- so it couldn't have been a wedding present, so, not a wedding present, but maybe an anniversary present or the birth-of- a-child present. but tell me a little bit about nell. i mean, it's lovely to hear a daughter-in-law saying that she was a lovely mother-in-law.
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
shooting in american history. does the tragedy in connecticut mean the country needs new gun laws? we'll have a fair & balanced look next. so, this board gives me rates for progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. jamie: this just in. the u.s. marine veteran who spent four months behind bars in one of mexico most violent prisons is now home. this is my favorite christmas story because jon hammar was jailed in deplorable conditions on a questionable gun charge in mexico. he was taken to a u.s. hospital with flu-like symptoms. just arriving back at his family's home in florida. that is where steve harrigan is live in palmetto bay, florida. steve, what a christmas gift for this family. >> reporter: jamie, it was rashable to see here, four or five minutes ago
countries, seen for retaliation for a new law in the u.s. that seeks to punish russians for human rights violations. the ban will take effect on january 1st, that's really right away it would halt all new adoptions and end those already in progress. incredible. a lot of families in the process of adopting children in russia. >> those poor kids. >>> want to move on to the weather. lots of snow, wind, hail everywhere across the u.s. the storm that brought snow and spun off tornadoes is still not over. ten deaths blamed on the storm. more than 2,400 flights have been canceled. it could dump more snow on new england and upstate new york today. boy, they don't need that. bonnie schneider with a look at the forecast. good morning. >> good morning. the storm we've been talking about is working its way to extreme northeastern new england. it is hitting canada hard. quebec is getting more snow. i mentioned yesterday that cold air would come in behind the system. it sure has. scranton at 26. below freezing in new york city at 31. just to let you know, it's not over yet. a brand new storm system se
come out against the idea of armed officers at every school and resisting calls for tighter gun laws. keep it here, in the next half hour of "starting point, " we'll talk about the nra's hardline stance on gun control with the organization's former political director, richard feldman. >>> senator mike crepo of idaho apologizing to constituestit co family after being arrested early saturday morning for driving under the influence. he failed a field sobriety test. he was pulled over after spotted running a red light and had a blood alcohol level of poin 11. the legal blood alcohol level is point 08. he was released on $1,000 bond. >>> a senior navy s.e.a.l. commander's death is being investigated as a suicide. navy commander john price's body was found after he didn't show up at an appointed time. he was serving as part of the special commanding unit s.e.a.l. team 4. he was not related in any investigation or controversies. >>> a north korean rocket had the ability to travel 6,000 miles, conceivably one could reach the u.s. this is based in part on a part they recovered from one of the
to new gun laws in the aftermath of the killings in newtown, connecticut. the ceo went on "meet the press" to defend his call for armed guards in every american school, but here's what a couple of front pages said about wane laperriere. one called him a gun nut and another one headlined with the crazy heest man on earth. laperriere he is not backing down. watch. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. i'll tell you what the american people -- i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. >> there are several lawmakers who are promising to introduce new gun control legislation, and the president formed a new team to come up with ways to limit assault weapons. >>> an idaho senator is apologizing after he was charged with driving under the investment. they arrested senator michael crapo early yesterday after he ran a red light. he failed several field sobriety tests and his blood alcohol level was .110 well above the legal leg legal limit. he's due in court january 4th. >>> just check out the scene
in the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 980s. -- 1980s. okay, then how does that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at
and at this time we were gifted with our law enforcement partners volunteering their time to have our officers spend time with their families. i know that on behalf of all of the men and women of the newtown police department we are eter l eternally grateful for their support and contributions today. >> you know, nobody could even imagine what the first responders and the officers went through, what they saw inside of that school. how are they coping today? what are you doing to help them in the community? >> besides giving them a day off, encouraging them to be with their families and go to religious services and to certainly reach out to their friends and neighbors so they feel a sense of love and hope. >> is there a sense of how this community, how your community and your own family can recover if that is possible to how you move forward? well, we certainly are going to move forward, suzanne. we have several memorials in our community. many are luminaries. our plan for the future is to gather all those gifts and those memorials and to eventually use them in some way to make this very large
chain laws in effect. with wind-- strong. however, there are some high cloud coverage from the pacific that will increase the clouds for tonight. a cloudy start and rainfall spreading to the south. coming up. >> the n r eight is rejecting new legislation. the nra -- once more armed guards. and is rejecting the new legislation drive. the n-r-a is rejecting new nationwide gun legislation in favor of pushing for morethe group made the statement a week after the shooting at >> "how many more?" >> reporter: performers and artists now joining with 800 mayors calling for a plan to end gun violence. but wayne lapierre, the chief executive officer and public face of the national rifle association, made clear on nbc's meet the press, that his organization will oppose legislation adding new restrictions to the sale of weapons or high capacity ammunition magazines. >> "look, i know there's a media machine in this country that wants to blame guns every time something happens, i know there's an anti-second amendment industry in this town, i know that there are political leads that for 20 years alway
, physically recognized by law which they become husband-and-wife. but. but why today's society, and accepting society sisto richart between men and women? people have partnerships and are not allowed to be asserted as has been our wife and although marriage isn't for everyone, shouldn't it be something everyone can decide to? how could she feel if you couldn't bear the person you love? the first is not driven in 2001 in the last, argentina 2010. 10 countries in 11 years isn't that exciting. love is the natural human emotion. why should the of the person you love change anything? why should we let authority to take her society can and can't get married? we as a society have a moral and social obligation to challenge abuse against gay people. make nsr campaign were serious against discrimination. it's against the law to discriminate. is there hypocrisy in our law? last year alone over 65% of, gay and young women. one fifth of and people try to take their own life and 19% of the community felt discriminated against because of their sexuality. we need to work together to change this to your desk
will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, y
intriguing people. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> after a brutal winter storm caused major headaches for people in the midwest who, well, the east coast, now they can expect guess what, more snow. this weekend, bonnie schneider is here to tell us which areas will be hardest hit. >> martin, looking at a lot of snow for new england, especially in the southeastern seconds of massachusetts. what's happening with this system is it's doing a meteorological phenomenon called bombing out. it means the low will deepen rapidly. and that will only intensify the storm in terms of bursts of snow as well as strong winds. you can see our radar picture shows we still have lighter snow falling in new york city, northern new jersey, connecticut and into massachusetts. but that rain is kind of swee
is igniting a firestorm among human rights activists, saying this law victimizes children to make a political point. now, the u.s. is the biggest destination for adopted russian children. some 60,000 of them have been given homes by americans since the fall of the soviet union. what's more heart breaking, there's nearly 52 children in the process of being adopted by american families right now. in some cases, families who have been waiting years to complete the adoption process. so, this new law will now block those kids from leaving russia. meaning, they will not be coming to the u.s. and given a new home. and so far, the u.s. has not responded. josh? >> thank you. amy? >> heartbreaking story there, josh. >>> we do have breaking weather news, though. much of the country under a blanket of snow. and sam's telling us, there's more snow on the way. >> watching this storm develop this morning, amy. good morning, everybody. 64% of the country now has the white stuff on the ground. let's show you some pictures out of maine, and the storm exiting that area. caused gusting winds up and down maine. l
elementary school she is pushing for stricter gun laws. >> i can't even tell you the number of deaths that are caused by guns that were bought by not having a simplele background check and the background system check needs to be reworked in some way. >> many people are also pushing for a ban on assault rifles. saying those type should be left for the military and not in the hands of civilians. >> they picked outside a sporting good store. it opened a short time and was forced to close because of the protest. people held up signs that said no guns here and protect your children >>> they are taking part in a holiday tradition right now. they are preparing thousands of meals for people who are unable to leave their homes for the holidays. >> for many seniors who live alone. a visit by a volunteer is the only contact they will have on christmas. >> they will be delivered on christmas morning. >> they are asking for holiday donations. they are holding curb side drop off through monday. they are specifically asking for hams and pantry items as well as socks and cash donations. they can be d
karenina," the film also stars jude law and hits theaters around the country this weekend, so now a scene from "anna karenina." tavis: ah-ha. >> here is an end to living in corners. >> we can be together. >> how can we? do you think my husband will make a present of me? >> run away. >> i would never see my son again. the laws are made by husbands and fathers. >> i will never forgive myself for your unhappiness. >> the happiest? i am like a starving beggar who has been given food. i am happy. no. this is my happiness. another period piece. >> another period piece. hair and big dress, yeah. tavis: yeah. all right, so let us explore this, shall we? >> yes. tavis: what is the -- i heard at a script and you say "interesting role, i want to do this." >> yeah. tavis: but there must be something here that draws you to -- >> to back then. tavis: yeah >> i think it is the element of fantasy, actually. i think it is the fact that you can kind of -- you leave everything you know behind you. you leave yourself, you leave your society, you leave your country, and you just connect with it on a totally e
. jefferson himself said that the duty of a magistrate is to the line of the law, but it is not the highest duty. that the survival and success of the country is your highest obligation. one person's imperial president i is another person's hero. one person's tyranny is another person's brilliant reform. part of what we have to struggle with from age to age in america is realizing that some generations there's going to be an excess of power useed in a way -- used in a way in which we approve, and in some generations there's going to be an excess of power used in ways which we would fight to the death against. but that's the way history has unfolded. and jefferson was on the right side of that in the very beginning. i want to talk about three quick lessons that i think all of us can, particularly our second term, early second term president might be able to take from jefferson. one goes to louisiana which is you need to be daring. jefferson understood that the political clock wasn't like a normal clock, it moved faster. ing as the president's clock ticks even in a first term, everybody else
part of south korea. geographically, historically and under international law. it features three photos of the islands. one shows the navy staging a drill in nearby waters. the report says the military has a strong willingness to defend the islands and has prepared a deterrent strategy. as in past reports, this latest white paper also uses the phrase enemy to define north korea. it notes the reclusive nation has honed missile technology through several tests and cites analysis of satellite images and concludes that scientists are enriching uranium at a new facility. >>> the defense and foreign policy files are just two in a stack that will be on park's desk when she takes over as president. many south koreans want her to rein in the country's conglomerates. these big business blocks have helped fuel the economy but they've also been suffocating small and medium sized companies. our reporter has the story. >> reporter: this man loves serving up bread and other goods to customers who visit his small bakery. he says his products are tasty and affordable. but the business he bought a year a
. they might own the light. there is another company, maybe a goldman sachs or a large law firm, that advises on that glass. ee often talk about the interi information superhighway. i like to think of it more that a network is a car that is tugging along the highway side- by-side with other networks. there is definitely a layering going on. that is crucial to understanding the way that the networks and internet operate individually and on a global basis and interconnect and very specifically. >> is there any fear that messages or whatever is being carrying on those networks could get lost? such as you took the wrong offramp on highway question mar. >> certainly. and are encoded with an address. sometimes those end up in the wrong place. it is based on trust. the routing system is based on trust and the network saying, i am over here. here are the networks behind me that you can reach through me. that announcement is not prescribed and is not really regulated based on the competence and trust of a given network engineer. occasionally and this happened last week, a network all say, actually the
in the development of international refugee law policy. the international office of refugees who won the 1938 nobel peace prize. he yearns to -- diaspora and he was the russians could do something that can to the inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a tattered to mail in equivalent to go around the world alone by bicycle. luckily he didn't have to do that. he departed shanghai on a better bicycle but upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok into a secondhand motorcycle in singapore. the benefactor gave him a brand-new aeriel motorcycle in karachi plus a letter the guaranteed parts and assistance in aerial offices around the world. in his published a county think the worldwide services of the ymca ,-com,-com ma shell oil and the firestone company and he depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil and food. the array of industry of good services that were now spread almost everywhere in the world. like the circumspect wing south asian diaspora he made his transit with think richmond of scattered white russians. above all there was his passport fo
and the laws allow that. >> reporter: so 21st century, she did it in 3d. >> reporter: it is after all, queen elizabeth that bridged the phone age to social networking and facebook and she's even a doodle on google. >> by the time she made her first televised christmas speech 55 years, the queen was already in the eyes of many britons, a monarch in the old and new. >> for those it's possible to see me today, it's another example of the speed of which things are changing all around us. >> reporter: more than ever at christmas she remains a symbol of longevity and tradition as the windsors look forward to kate's first child and heir to the throne at next year's christmas reunion. jim meceda, nbc news, london. >>> if you plan to head to the movie, you better make sure you have a little extra time because many of this season's blockbusters are clocking in at almost three hours. a report from hollywood. >> reporter: they are epic productions, earning oscar buzz. >> shall we stop this bleeding? >> reporter: this year's blockbusters have something else in common. you better block out three hours if
at home and a reference and a baby yesterday the rotunda in here again today as a young kid in law school, listening to danny's speech at the democratic national convention. it seemed like it was the only voice of reason that broke through this god-awful cloud. and he stood there with such absolute confidence and certitude in the midst of all that was going on, like what he had to just self-evident. how could anybody doubt what he said? he was, in my 36 years in the senate more trusted by his colleagues that any man or woman i ever served with. i remember when the church committee decided the intelligence community was out of control and we needed intelligence community. i remember being part of, as a young kid because mike mansfield rockne and to keep engaged. compared to the discussion was due at state committee? and there was no discussion. this is like so-and-so or. it was danny too. no discussion to the best of my recollection, virtually none. when it came time to deal with watergate, there is a combination of danny inouye, sam ervin and howard baker. the only person among whom there
pension costs for government employees. michigan passing a right to work law so you don't have to join a union in one of the most unionized states anywhere and demise of twinkies when a bakers union refused to accept any concessions at all on retirement costs. it is always money at heart of the these disputes and unions seem to be getting harder and harder edged about this. let's remember unions represent less than 7% of the private workforce in this nation. they represent 40% of the government workers. here we've got a private union strike that could happen starting this coming sunday t could be crippling. which means they will sell it fast. heather: neither said no to renewing talks. the national trade associations, they have even appealed to president obama use the taft-hartley injunction to hold off this strike for 80 days. >> reporter: right. to force them to get back to the table and negotiate. you have to wonder how this will turn out. i wish them luck on both sides. heather: thank you so much, dennis. >> reporter: thank you, heather the. gregg: snow, rain, freezing drizzle maki
is not the region the marriage law should not hear new national campaign. as young people, wouldn't we support the relevant curriculum giving vocational training had a fair wage we get our first up? for better access to buses and trains to allow us to get to school and work? i'd rather be well-informed, well trained, well paid her well-traveled than well, married. and i am not alone. according to the office of national statistics, the number of under 20s getting married represents less than half a percent of all marriages in "the sunday times" in the annual number of marriages is at the lowest for over 100 years. someone once said of the state temporary insanity. without sounding too sappy, love doesn't need a cure. love is about marriage. it is marriage that is immoral without love. perhaps we should be focusing on reducing the uk's high divorce rate rather than promoting marriage. the coalition for equal marriage is love is love regardless of gender. well, i would add that love is love regardless of marital status. and while the majority of us, almost all of us absolutely believe in marriage
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
be the network of a law firm that perhaps, you know, only spans from new york to los angeles. it might be a network like facebook or google. but what's striking and necessary to understand the way it manifests itself physically is that networks carry networks. you might have a global backbone company like a level three or a tata that own the strands of glass and that own the conduits that might run perhaps beside railroad tracks across the country. you might have another company, sort of a mid-sized network services company, one called hurricane electric, that might actually illuminate those strands of glass. they might own the light. ask and then you might have a goldman sachs or large law firm that buys bandwidth on that glass. so it's, you know, we often talk about b the information superhighway as if the network itself were the highway. i hike to think of it more -- i like to think of it more that a given network is a car chugging along the highway side by side with other networks because there's definitely a layering going on that's crucial to understanding the way in which the ne
arrived in new york one of the first things he did was to talk about international copyright law. he felt that writers were being cheated himself among them of their due earnings because copyright editors side with publishers. there was no international copyright law ever in america. his books were endlessly reprinted without him getting a penny. this was regarded... his statement on this was regarded as outrageous but the american press who denounced him instantly and said if that's all you've got to say go home. we don't want to know. we don't want you coming here and lecturing us on this. they believed that you could download anything from the internet free. the man had written a book and it was in the public domain. >> freedom is very interesting there because in some sense what he hated about america, what the people made too free with him this was the great land of opportunity, the great land of freedom. the grate democratic experiment. yet people were perhaps a little too familiar with hip. them didn't... he didn't like the fact that they treated him as an equal. that's very strang
to president vladimir putin whether he signs it in to law and today he gave every indication he will. he told a meeting so far i see no reason not to sign it although i have to review the final text and weigh everything. if it comes in to law on january 1st, it is uncertainty for around 46 american families who have adoptions being processed right now. criticism has come from the state department which says it is misguided to link the fate of children to unrelated political considerations. but criticism also in russia and from within president putin's own party. that's because russia has an adoption problem. last year, more than 100,000 children living in state institutions and russians themselves do not adopt in large numbers. in comparison over the last two decades, more than 60,000 russian children have been taken in by american families. no other country helps more. some russian politicians say it's an embarrassment their country doesn't care for its own and they hope the bill will encourage people to act. craig? >> duncan, from our london bureau today, thank you. sir, do appreciate that.
to become its director. he began at oxford in the junior position in law and social science of what he wrote to the ranks about the institution to become a tech executive. the cultural nature of human development, the accidental gorilla, peggy pascoe's book on law and race in america. daniel walker and his history of america between 1815 and 1848. ladies and gentlemen, niko pfund. anna. >> thank you very much for coming here. for listening to us talk friday afternoon. i'm so that we chose to spend your afternoon with us. i have spent 10 years working for a library in and spent about half of that time physically working in a library. as a director of nyu press, i am thrilled to be here and to talk to you about publishing. i was asked to give you a quick overview of our philosophy. it sounds a little pretentious, but i would say that in terms of how i look at what we do, it is squarely driven by the message of oup. we often say that we don't exist to make money, but we do have to make money to do the things that we exist to do. it really doesn't want form all the work that we engage in. perso
is causing it and why it's so important to find a cure. >>> let's start this half hour with a law signed by russia's president overnight that bans adoptions by u.s. citizens. agonizing news for american couples looking to start or expand their families. nbc's michelle kosinski is here this morning with more. >> it more russian children are adopted here in america than any other country. we're talking tens of thousands of country over the last 20 years or so. as of this morning, russia has just made this illegal effective immediately in a sort of diplomatic dispute with the u.s. that seems to have very little to do with the children. they're like any proud parent. americans posting their stories of adopting russian children, showing their happiness on the internet. >> so we're leaving. >> this family traveled to russia in 2007 overjoyed to adopt ben. >> you've gotten to be a big boy. >> a head full of hair. >> i know. like daddy's. >> a relationship that took nearly a year to get started. >> it's a million pieces of paper. you laugh about it, but it really is quite an intensive process. >
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